You’re Fat and it’s Your Fault!

Posted by on Feb 23, 2016 in Exercise & Lifestyle, General |

Got your attention, didn’t I? Before anyone gets all tied up in knots ready to behead me for my apparent rudeness and lack of sympathy, I don’t agree with what the title says. This was just my attempt at click-bait because I feel that this subject needs to be addressed from another point of view.

The website Upworthy recently posted a link to an article that talks about a study that was done at the University of Pennsylvania funded, in most part, by the National Institute on Aging. This study looked at the idea of “fining” fat people if they didn’t exercise. Wow. Apparently the study was trying to look for ways to motivate people to become healthier and thinner. But here’s the thing: weight isn’t the best indicator of health. There are many overweight individuals who are otherwise healthy and many thin people who are horribly ill. The idea that we can tell someone’s health by just looking at them is ludicrous and yet that is what most people will do, including many doctors.

While this subject isn’t specific to those of us with type 2 diabetes, it is certainly closely related. We all know of the stigma that is attached to our disease and it is continually perpetuated in the media and medical communities. The fact that this study was even done is very telling. You want to fine fat people for failing to exercise? Really?

Now let’s look at this from another perspective. Lack of added exercise is a HUGE problem in our society (and that pun was not intended. Lack of exercise is a problem for everyone, not just the overweight). Our hectic lives, jobs that require us to sit for hours a day, cities that are designed for cars and not people, the Internet and exhaustion have all made it easier to just not exercise. But we should exercise, in fact I’ll go further and say that we must exercise! Really! I’ve posted on my personal blog before about how exercise has benefitted me. I also know how difficult it is to keep it up when life gets in the way. I’m not here to say that it’s easy but it is worth doing.

Here’s what gets under my skin about this study and what it implies. Quit pointing at fat people and saying that they’re a problem! (I should have used caps.) People who are overweight are vilified as being lazy and saying that we should fine them for not exercising is indicating that they’re stupid and need to be tricked into walking like some toddler who won’t pick up their toys. YES, overweight people should exercise. YES, it will benefit their lives. NO, they’re not the only ones who should be moving. I’m not implying that overweight people should be coddled and patted on the head while telling them that it’s not their fault. Maybe it is and maybe it isn’t. Exercise is hard. Exercise is even harder when you’re heavy. Should we condemn people who are struggling with this? I don’t think so. Another very important thing to consider is that there are many medical reasons that people are overweight; insulin resistance has been shown to encourage fat storage, thyroid issues, medications can cause weight gain and the realization that processed carbs are addicting is rarely discussed in the mainstream.

So, what should we as a nation do to fix this issue? How about figuring out a way to re-teach our society about the importance of eating real food as opposed to processed junk? How about subsidizing vegetable farmers (other than the corn growers) in order to decrease the cost of vegetables? Community cooking classes and vegetable gardens sound awesome. Why can’t communities put some bucks into making it easier to walk instead of drive? What about having employers put programs in place that encourage their employees to exercise while at work, you know like a room with a few treadmills like you see at hotels or a mandatory 20 minute stretch or walk break with extra kudos for taking the stairs? People don’t need to be bullied or shamed in order to improve their lives, that doesn’t work! People need to be shown what a healthy life looks like and be given the opportunities and information to make it possible for them to achieve that health. Yes, overweight people should be exercising and so should everyone else. The reward will be healthier individuals who are happier with their lives. That is worth much more than a few pennies in their pocket and it can be done without shaming. Quit pointing at the overweight as the problem and begin solving the real problems facing all of us: lack of real opportunities to improve everyone’s health. Let’s find ways to encourage each other instead of blaming and shaming. I can get behind that.

Read More

Don’t be a victim

Posted by on Jul 3, 2015 in Diabetes & Emotions, General, Management & Care | 5 comments

The word “victim” never entered my vocabulary when it came to my life with diabetes. Why would it? Sure, it isn’t great luck that I developed type 2 but, other than genetics, no one “gave” it to me, so how am I a victim? Well, yesterday the light bulb finally went on over my head. You see, yet again, there was an uproar in the diabetes online community revolving around a “joke” that inferred that soda causes diabetes; that sugar causes diabetes. Immediately, the type 1 community was up in arms defending their disease, including a high profile singer who has type 1. I don’t blame them at all! The “joke” was insulting, wrong and does nothing but perpetuate harmful myths about diabetes. The perpetrator of this kerfuffle was quick to point out that they weren’t referring to type 1, only type 2. That just made it worse. Due to the high profile singer, the story was picked up by several news channels and magazines. When the difference between types was discussed, video of overweight Americans were shown to indicate type 2. <sarcasm> You see, apparently, only fat, lazy people develop type 2. They are the ones who are guzzling soda and should stop. </sarcasm>

I can’t tell you how tired I am of trying to stop the hurtful, always inaccurate myths surrounding type 2 diabetes. It’s like canoeing upstream without a paddle. It feels like David against Goliath without a stone. It’s akin to removing a snow drift with a spoon. It’s nearly impossible. I’m not here to bust any myths. I’m not here to correct the inaccuracies. I’m here to tell you that you need to stop being a victim.

The stigma that is attached to type 2 diabetes is doing huge amounts of harm in our community. We are made to feel as if we did this to ourselves (we didn’t). We are told that we just need a little self-control, to stop eating junk, and we’ll be cured (bunk). Those types of mainstream thoughts not only keep people from making donations to diabetes research funds but it makes those of us with this disease feel awful; feel less-than; feel guilty. People who feel that way may be less likely to take proper care of themselves. Why bother? It’s my fault, right?

Stigma is bullying. Cowards who hide behind their computer screens and sling ugly comments to people who are struggling with a disease that they didn’t ask for, are bullies. No better than the mean kids on the playground. They must be stopped. As a mother, I’ve had some experience with bullies picking on my son. I found that when they were confronted, they backed down. Calling them out worked, although there was quite a bit of fear on my son’s part, I’m sure. He learned a valuable lesson though: don’t be a victim.

My plea to you is this: Don’t be a victim. Don’t give the bullies power over you. Do what you can to show the world that, even though you have diabetes, it doesn’t have you. Don’t let the naysayers keep you from doing what you need to do to live a healthy life. We may have a hard time busting those myths but that doesn’t mean we have to stop trying. What we can do, and should, is defend ourselves and not hide. No one should have to apologize because they have a serious condition. Everyone deserves kindness and compassion when they are dealing with diabetes of any type. Speak up and speak loudly about what living with type 2 diabetes is really like. Arm yourself with a few myth-busting truths you can pull out and use when someone tries to bully you or any PWDT2. Don’t be ashamed. Don’t let them win. I don’t know about you but I refuse to be a victim.

Read More

I am for, “Patient Participation in Medical Product Discussions”

Posted by on Dec 1, 2014 in General | 1 comment

This is a guest post by Bennet Dunlap who blogs at http://www.ydmv.net/. The content below was originally published on his blog. I apologize for the formatting, which is my doing.

FDA has a very short term docket (30 days closes on Dec 4) about Patient Participation in Medical Product Discussions. Right smack in the middle of Diabetes month Thanksgiving. Not ideal comment time.
So DOC, we need your help.
Stephen Shaul started the ball rolling to get some comments in. The goal of comments is to be complimentary of the 2014 actions FDA has taken with the diabetes community and ask to keep that going, and maybe step that up with a PDUFA meeting. http://www.ydmv.net/search?q=pdufa.
If you can cut paste a comment great, if you can riff on the talking points making you comments similar but unique, even better. Everything you need is here: http://www.stripsafely.com/comment-on-patient-participation-with-fda/.
Personally I would like to see most o the comments in the docket be on diabetes issues. Let’s dominate the docket.
Time is short.
Thanks for stepping up.
Bennet
Read More

The Truth about Type 2 Diabetes

Posted by on Oct 21, 2014 in General | 2 comments

(Originally posted on my personal blog.)

  • You did not “do this to yourself”.
  • Yes, your lifestyle before your diagnosis most likely helped you toward developing type 2 diabetes. (There are ways to develop type 2 that have nothing to do with weight etc., but they are the minority.)
  • Go back and read the first listed item.
  • You can’t develop type 2 diabetes (or any type) by eating sugar.
  • There is a genetic component to type 2. If you don’t have that genetic component, you will likely not develop type 2, regardless of your weight, level of activity or love of Snickers.
  • You can thank your ancestors for your diagnosis. (Thanks Grandma!)
  • You should dramatically lower your consumption of processed and junk foods once you’re diagnosed. (You don’t have to do that cold turkey, but the sooner the better for you in the long run.)
  • You should dramatically lower your consumption of processed and junk foods whether you have diabetes or not.
  • Some people can eat bread/potatoes/pasta when they have type 2 diabetes. Some cannot.
  • Some oral diabetes medications cause some nasty side effects. If you’re about to start taking a medication, don’t ask others if you will have side effects. We don’t know. The best way to find out is to try the medication and see how you react.
  • There are no magic pills, miraculous diet or voodoo that will make your diabetes go away. You need to learn to live with it.
  • Everyone is different, and so is their diabetes.
  • Regular exercise makes a big difference in your ability to manage your diabetes.
  • Weight loss should not be your goal; a healthier lifestyle should be the goal. Eat better and exercise more often and the weight will most likely decline.
  • Losing weight when you have type 2 diabetes isn’t easy. Don’t focus on the scale, unless it’s weighing your food.
  • Don’t ask others what the best fruits are for people with diabetes. The best fruit for you to eat is the one that doesn’t cause your blood glucose to raise too high. Only you can determine that.
  • Go back and read the first item in this list.
  • Your goal should never be to “get off the pills”. Never. Your goal should be to change your lifestyle so that you can do your best to manage your diabetes. Better health, despite diabetes, should be your goal and medications can help you achieve that goal.
  • You cannot get rid of diabetes. Learn how to live a good life with it.
  • If you take insulin, don’t fall into the trap of think you can still eat that junk food. You can, but it’s not your best choice.
  • Diabetes, any type, can cause you to fret, focus on the wrong things, whine, complain and generally feel like you’ve been given a raw deal. You have, but life with diabetes can be just as good as it was before, maybe better.
  • It’s ok to fret, focus on the wrong things, whine, complain and generally feel like you’ve been given a raw deal. Just don’t live there.
  • If diabetes causes you to be depressed, seek professional help. According to this paper on the International Diabetes Federation webpage (http://www.idf.org/webdata/docs/PIIS0168822710000471.pdf), in their study,“… about 45% of all diabetes patients had undiagnosed depression.”
  • Connecting with other people with diabetes helps, whether it is in person or online.
  • Food is not your enemy. Don’t give it so much power over you.
  • There are lots of yummy things to eat that won’t cause you grief with your blood sugar.
  • There is a huge stigma attached to diabetes. People can be mean and hurtful. Either ignore them or try to educate them, but don’t let them undermine your hard work.
  • Go back and read the first item.
  • Yes, you can have that dessert.
  • Don’t whine if your blood sugar rises too high after eating said dessert. It’s your choice, so deal with the consequences.
  • Don’t feel guilty…about your diagnosis or the food you eat or your lack of exercise. You know what you should do but that doesn’t mean you’ll do it all the time. Give yourself a break!
  • Don’t ask others how many carbs you should eat. We don’t know. Work with your dietician (if you’ve been lucky enough to see one) and experiment with your meter.
  • If your dietician or health care provider has you doing/eating something that doesn’t seem to work for you, speak up!
  • “As physicians, we counsel, we coach, we prescribe, we cheerlead. But the only person who treats diabetes is the person who has it.” Physician Daniel Lorber
  • People with diabetes are just like people without diabetes. Some are heavy. Some are thin. Some exercise a lot. Some don’t. Some love sweets. Some hate chocolate (!!). Some are liberal. Some are conservative. All of them are just people who should exercise and have to pay closer attention to food, but shouldn’t everyone?
Read More

Food diaries and honesty

Posted by on Jun 17, 2014 in Eating & Cooking |

People with diabetes are constantly aware of food, that’s a given. We need to pay attention to what we’re eating, how many carbs, when we’re eating and longing for foods we crave but probably shouldn’t eat. I have kept food journals in the past to get a grip on how different foods affect my blood sugar. I find them to be helpful. I was somewhat careful to write down what was in a particular meal (along with before and after glucose readings) but I never spent time writing down everything I ate in a day. A recent attempt to pinpoint another health issue, separate from my diabetes, was not only eye-opening but a bit uncomfortable.

I’ve been having “gut issues” for months now. I got to thinking about the possibility of lactose intolerance since I have family members who deal with that. Pretty much the only dairy I eat these days is cheese and a bit of cream in my coffee  but I figured it was worth a try. A food diary seemed like a good idea because, who knows, it might be something else I’m eating that’s causing me grief. If I just kept track of everything I ate for a week maybe my doctor could look at that and say, “Well there’s the culprit!” So I began. I lasted two days.

Have you ever really paid attention to everything you eat? Regardless of the fact that I think about food all the time, I never realized just how much I was eating. It was embarrassing. When you have to stop and write down what you’re eating, it puts a huge spotlight on that snack you’ve decided to eat. Knowing that I had to “own up” to eating something, I would either change my mind and eat something “safer” or else eat it anyway and then feel guilty. I even considered not writing something down just so no one else would see what I’d done! Talk about feeling like Big Brother is watching. It was awful.

I’m writing this to bring up the point that, even though we may have made dramatic changes to what we eat on a daily basis, even though we may be committed to a healthier lifestyle, even though we “know better”, it can be so easy to derail our good intentions with mindless munching. This is not to say that we can’t have a treat now and then, but it would be in our best interest to make it a planned treat and curtail the munching for munching’s sake. My short experiment in food journaling may not have been the success I was hoping for but it did cause me to pay closer attention to what I’m eating. I’m much more aware now and have been making better choices. What could you do to improve your diet?

Read More