When you go to an amusement park, many people want to ride the roller coaster. The anticipation. The excitement. The fear. It’s thrilling! Most people who ride roller coasters enjoy what observers would call sheer terror, at least from their facial expressions. The unknown at the top of the hill. Not knowing if it is a turn or a drop. The ups and downs of a roller coaster and the speed are what make it exciting.  At the end, many want to take that ride again.

It’s not the same with the diabetes roller coaster. The ups and downs are terrifying, but not in a thrill ride sort of way. The uncertainty of complications. The anticipation of how food and activity works to benefit or harm of glucose levels. This fear is not exciting. The unknown of when the ride will once again be on steady ground. Faces showing terror that doesn’t end with someone begging to take that ride again.

Many times guilt comes along for the ride. If only I hadn’t eaten that. If only I took a walk today. If only I could keep on top of things. Anger joins in. Yelling. Sometimes cursing. Bitterness toward a disease. Sadness also sits in the next car. Tears. Possible depression. Fear tags along. Hoping to keep complication away.

Yes, diabetes is a roller coaster ride. Not only dealing with glucose levels going up and down, but also the mixture of emotions that go along with it. It may not be a fun ride, but it can be a little less scary with the support of family and friends.

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